Rowley Way ( Alexandra Estates )

Location : Camden, London, England
Architect : Neave Brown
Built : 1978-1997

The expansive site of Alexandra Road Estate near South Hampstead tube station lies between the railway line into Euston to the North and the brick blocks of the Ainsworth estate to the south. The key elements of site are two parallel pedestrian streets separated by a park, formed by two rows of terraces against the railway, and the other by a further row of terraces forming a street with the existing Ainsworth Estate. Neave Brown proved with Alexandra Road that low-rise housing could be delivered in the heart of a city at the density of a tower block but with the quality of public space that high-rise seldom attains.


Next

Hyatt Regency Embarcadero Center

Location : San Francisco, California
Architect : John Portman Architects
Built : 1973

The Hyatt Regency is part of the Embarcadero Center, a mixed-used project that was envisioned as a sort of Modernist version of New York City's Rockefeller Center. It is comprised of a three level esplanade, terraces, shops and office buildings. One of the center's focal points is the giant concrete tulip structure that actually supports a large circular walkway.


Next

Phillips Exeter Academy Library

Location : Exeter, New Hampshire
Architect : Louis Kahn
Built : 1965 - 1972

A seemingly plain brick exterior hides one of the great works by Louis Kahn. The central atrium is reminiscent of Etienne-Louis Boullee (1785) drafted plans for a library with it's core created by a sort of concrete exoskeleton. At the very top, two enormous concrete crossbeams reflect and diffuse sunlight from thin clerestory windows, filling the atrium with a cool glow. The brilliant combination of the teak wood against concrete helps to soften the space while creating an alluring backdrop.


Next

Geisel Library

Location : UC San Diego Campus
Architect : William Pereira
Built: 1968 - 1970

The Geisel Library was intended to be the cultural and social focal point of UC San Diego.The building is supported by sixteen external concrete trusses, which were originally designed to be inside, but were moved outside in order to increase useable space. This made quite the brutalist facade. The floors are stepped like a ziggurat and like temples of old, there is a mystery inside. The much talked about third floor is basically a plenum space surrounded by open courtyard. The real discoveries are the two subterranean levels which house the study and public areas.



Next

Reyes House

Location : Coyoacan, Mexico City, Mexico
Architect : ( unknown ) Project Architect : Pedro Reyes
Built : ( circa 1980 ) - Renovated : 2014

Mexican brutalist Teodoro Gonzalez de Leon should be proud of this renovated structure in the heart of the creative hub Coyoacan. Hammered concrete walls are facet of brutalism no one can do without. In the way it makes some places feel cold, it makes this place feel alive. The stone floor is inspired by the nearby Anahuacalli Museum, the sort-of temple designed by Diego Rivera in 1957 who was also a former resident of the quarter. The redesign of the space was meant to bring together ancient world techniques and aesthetic up against the modern cultural presence of Mexico.





Next

Miami Marine Stadium

Location : Key Biscayne, Miami, Florida
Architect : Hilario Candela ( Pancoast Architects )
Built : 1962-1964

Miami Marine Stadium was built to support popular boating activities and water sports of the 1960's. It was the first stadium built specifically to view boat races although, many concerts were held here on through the late 1980's. At the time it was built, its' roof set the record for the longest span of cantilevered concrete in the world. With it's open-air seating and shell that shaded onlookers from the hot Florida sun, it was the perfect venue.


Upcoming Block

Share this Block

Embracing Brutalist Architecture

Upcoming Block

Coolest Playgrounds Designed by Architects

Coolest Playgrounds Designed by Architects